A New Tool

Finished a new book about a month ago, “Processing Under Pressure” by Matthew J. Sharps (link at the bottom). It had been sitting on my shelf for a long while, and I honestly don’t remember if I bought a copy or if it was a gift. If it was a gift, and it was from you, thanks.

Either way, it probably wound up on my shelf because the publisher used the same stock photo for the title that my publisher did for a book I wrote, “Force Decisions.” Funny, right? And also a cautionary tale about using stock photos, probably. But it was a good book. A good read and probably the best layman’s introduction I’ve found for some of the neuroscience behind decision making and fear.

There were a lot of crossovers between Sharps book and other stuff I like, and that’s always gratifying. He presented academic theories that were very close corollaries of Gordon Graham’s “discretionary time.” And ConCom’s Monkey and Lizard. Good stuff.

There was also a tool in the book. “Feature Intensive Analysis.” He didn’t describe the actual process, it was more of a, ‘people have a tendency to gestalt, but when you have time you will make fewer mistakes if you analyze the features of the problem.’ So I let the concept sit and played with it for a bit.

Underlying background concept. Labeling, or “ist-ing” is one of the reliable signs that your monkey brain is in control. We call people names to put them in a tribe we don’t have to listen to. If I call you an asshole, or any descriptor that puts you in a group, whether your political, religious or national affiliations or… it puts you outside my tribe, Which means (to my monkey brain) I don’t have to listen to you. It protects me 100% from the possibility that your arguments might have merit. We all do this.

Sharps used the term gestalt as a related concept. A gestalt, traditionally, is when you see the totality of a concept. A car is thousands of little parts and each car is different, but the gestalt of “car” exists in our head as a unified thing. Professor Sharps pointed out, that just as labeling is a tool to prevent you from analysis, so is a gestalt. Whether you use the ConCom word of labeling or Sharps’ interpretation of gestalt, it is a way to not think. And people are lazy. We have a definite tendency to avoid the laziness of hard thinking.

Shading into politics, one of the things that has been annoying me is the “all good or all bad” soundbite nature of most of the things I see discussed asserted. I realized these are gestalts. If I call you a “fascist” (or asshole, most people don’t distinguish) I don’t have to think, I’m done.

So I decided to take a stab at my own feature intensive analysis of my gestalts in politics. On one axis (sorry, talking about fascists here, forgive the pun) a list of my political labels– communist, democrat (party), fascist, libertarian, republican (party), socialist…*
On the other axis, traits that I consider important. The features. I tried to be careful with the source of the features. For instance, I didn’t use the modern academic definition of fascism but Mussolini’s definition. I used Marx directly for the features of communism. For the stuff that wasn’t in the literature, I used personal observation when available. If I didn’t have literature or personal observation, I gave that feature a null value. If literature contradicted, I gave a null value. If observation and literature contradicted, I went with observation. For instance if a group insisted that they were for personal freedom and peace, but called for everyone who disagreed with them to be executed and planted bombed (I’ve just read both ‘Prairie Fire’ and ‘Underground’) they got marks for “being okay with using violence to silence their opposition.”

I may not have used the FI Analysis the way Sharps intended, since I was back-engineering from a vague description of effects. But I liked it. I found it useful. It did confirm some of my gestalts, some of my impressions of how closely related some of the political labels were. But if it had been just confirming what I already believed, I’d be pretty skeptical. Like everyone else, there’s a part of me that likes pre-existing beliefs validated. That’s not what happened. I found a few quite unexpected similarities and differences.

And before anyone asks, no. I am not going to share the specific analysis here. 1) I didn’t do it for you, I was testing a test for (to an extent) objectively testing my own instincts and, 2) There are few things more likely to put you, as a reader, in your monkey brain than to show you that your favorite affiliation is actually 80% similar to your most hated.

*Not right/left or liberal/conservative, I consider those to be a different taxonomy. I could do an FI analysis those traits, but it would be an apples-to-oranges comparison with the affiliations listed.

https://www.amazon.com/Processing-Under-Pressure-Matthew-Sharps/dp/160885177X/ref=as_sl_pc_tf_til?tag=chirontrainin-20&linkCode=w00&linkId=27a29989134093b7ce17ea260984694a&creativeASIN=160885177X

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