Micromanagement ≠ Leadership

I think it was Machiavelli in his Art of War that said “The greatest reward for a fighting man is simply to trust him.” That resonated. I’d worked for a long time under a variety of people put in leadership positions. Just being in the position doesn’t make someone a leader. The true leaders, the ones that inspired loyalty and dedication, had alls aid, at some point, “You’ve got this.” And let me handle things on my own.

Machiavelli (if I’m attributing it to the right person) specifically applied it to fighters. I don’t think that’s necessarily true–everyone takes micromanagement as an insult. But it’s more explicit in dangerous professions. A firefighter I know is incensed that he has to spend more time in each report documenting his PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) than his job. He showed me one report– nearly half a page of what equipment he put on and in what order. Barely four lines on extracting the subject from the wrecked car.

When you are entrusted with life or death decisions, being treated like a child throws a huge mixed message.

So here’s the deal. If you are a micromanager, you aren’t a leader. You aren’t even a shitty leader. You’re a busybody who likes to feel important by interfering with better people than yourself. If you have employees who need to be watched every second either you need to hire adults or, more likely they aren’t the problem.

When you get the micromanager who always finds fault, it is something else. If everything a worker does is wrong, no matter how closely they follow policy or even if they were just following the last set of orders, what’s going on isn’t even management, micro or otherwise. It is straight-up victim grooming. Creating a field of passive people for the manager’s games.

I doubt if most micromanagers realize what they are. Humans are excellent at rationalizing and it’s easy to reframe micromanagement as “Being explicit” or “I’m a hands-on guy.” But on the tiny chance someone reads this and sees through their own bullshit and decides to change… it won’t be easy.

No matter your intentions, all those years of micromanagement have instilled in your people the idea that you don’t trust them– and that they can’t trust you. They will literally assume that you turning over a new leaf is a trap. That you will give them enough trust to show some initiative and then will ruthlessly punish them for that initiative.

This easily becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. When you change your behavior and don’t notice any benefit for a day or a week or a month, it is easy to revert. The reversion just becomes further evidence that your attempt at change was insincere.

Note: Going out of my lane a little, but setting up for the next post, which is about the teaching equivalent of micromanagement.

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